Home Entertainment Comedian George Logan who soared to stardom as drag artist Dr Evadne Hinge dies aged 78

Comedian George Logan who soared to stardom as drag artist Dr Evadne Hinge dies aged 78

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Comedian George Logan who soared to stardom as drag artist Dr Evadne Hinge in hit BBC sitcom Hinge and Bracket dies aged 78 – as Benidorm actor Bobby Crush leads tributes

  • The South Lanarkshire born performer rose to fame in the 1970s and 80s 

Ground-breaking drag performer George Logan, who soared to stardom on the BBC for his role in the musical act Hinge and Bracket, has died aged 78. 

The cabaret performer achieved fame by playing Dr Evadne Hinge in a series of TV and radio shows in the 1970s and 80s. 

The South Lanarkshire born comedian launched his drag routine with fellow comedian Patrick Fyffe at the Edinburgh Festival in 1974.   

The two comedians met performing in clubs in London in the 1970s, before being picked up by the BBC. 

Benidorm star Bobby Crush led tributes to the pioneering performer, with a post on social media marking the comedian’s death. 

George Logan (pictured), who soared to stardom on the BBC for his role in the musical act Hinge and Bracket, has died aged 78.

George Logan (pictured), who soared to stardom on the BBC for his role in the musical act Hinge and Bracket, has died aged 78.

The comedian soared to fame as part of the musical duo 'Hinge and Bracket'

The comedian soared to fame as part of the musical duo ‘Hinge and Bracket’

The performer documented his experiences growing up in Scotland in the 1960s in his 2015 autobiography 'A Boy Called Audrey'

The performer documented his experiences growing up in Scotland in the 1960s in his 2015 autobiography ‘A Boy Called Audrey’

‘RIP George Logan, also known as ‘Dr Evadne Hinge’ of ‘Hinge and Bracket’,’ Crush said.

‘We appeared in panto together in this glorious production of at the Theatre Royal Plymouth in 1989… I’m saddened by news of his passing today.’

The drag performer previously documented his experiences growing up in Scotland in the 1960s, in his autobiography titled ‘A Boy Called Audrey’.

In the 2015 book, he explained his first entry into showbusiness at a pub near to where he lived.  

‘A gay pub near where I lived put on drag acts. One day, the pianist didn’t turn up. The landlady said, ‘You play the piano don’t you? I’ll give you two quid to play for the act?’ So I did, and became the regular pianist.

‘As I was watching all these acts I realised they were getting eight quid for doing gags I’d heard a hundred times. I thought, ‘I could do that and play the piano at the same time and keep the whole 10 quid to myself.

‘That’s how I got into show business, although I didn’t get the 10 quid. As I was a beginner I got eight for doing both – but eight quid for half an hours work wasn’t bad.’

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