Home Entertainment Legendary BBC comedy set to RETURN for 40th anniversary festivities, star teases 

Legendary BBC comedy set to RETURN for 40th anniversary festivities, star teases 

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Comedy fans are set to be delighted after hints of classic show’s return set tongues wagging on Monday morning. 

Blackadder star Tony Robinson, 76, who played blundering Baldrick in the Eighties comedy, appeared on Lorraine, where he spoke to stand-in host Christine Lampard, 44, about the upcoming 40th anniversary of the show. 

Alluding to the idea of a return, he teased: ‘All I’m going to say is: everybody likes to celebrate a 40th anniversary, don’t they? So there must be some fresh way we can celebrate our 40th birthday, wouldn’t you think?’

Richard Curtis and Ben Elton-created Blackadder, which starred Rowan Atkinson as the titular character, appeared on screens from 1983 to 1989 for 24 episodes and starred a host of famous actors including Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie. 

Last month, Tony appeared in a Blackadder skit for Comic Relief however he was not joined by his co-star Rowan for the scene at the charity spectacular. 

Exciting! Blackadder star Tony Robinson, 76, who played blundering Baldrick in the Eighties comedy, appeared on Lorraine, where he spoke to stand-in host Christine Lampard, 44, about the upcoming 40th anniversary of the show

Exciting! Blackadder star Tony Robinson, 76, who played blundering Baldrick in the Eighties comedy, appeared on Lorraine, where he spoke to stand-in host Christine Lampard, 44, about the upcoming 40th anniversary of the show

Richard Curtis and Ben Elton-created Blackadder, which starred Rowan Atkinson as the titular character, appeared on screens from 1983 to 1989 for 24 episodes and starred a host of famous actors including Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie.

 Richard Curtis and Ben Elton-created Blackadder, which starred Rowan Atkinson as the titular character, appeared on screens from 1983 to 1989 for 24 episodes and starred a host of famous actors including Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie.

Happy days: Alluding to the idea of a return, he teased: 'All I'm going to say is: everybody likes to celebrate a 40th anniversary, don't they? So there must be some fresh way we can celebrate our 40th birthday, wouldn't you think?' (Tony pictured with co-star Rowan Atkinson)

Happy days: Alluding to the idea of a return, he teased: ‘All I’m going to say is: everybody likes to celebrate a 40th anniversary, don’t they? So there must be some fresh way we can celebrate our 40th birthday, wouldn’t you think?’ (Tony pictured with co-star Rowan Atkinson)

During his Lorraine appearance, Tony revealed that Prince William is a fan of the show and even suggested joining for an appearance ‘if he was asked’. 

Tony was honoured in the 2013 Queen’s birthday honours for his public and political service, which is where he struck up conversation about the appearance. 

He said: ‘When I was being knighted by Prince William, I’m down on my knees. He brings the old sword down and he says to me: ‘I am such a fan of Blackadder.’

‘I said to him “Would you be on it?” He said: “Yeah, if you asked me”. So in other words, I was casting whilst I was knighting.’

Last year, Rowan addressed returning to the show in an interview with Radio Times and said it ‘certainly wasn’t impossible. That’s about a optimistic as I can be.

‘I’d rather not speculate on when it could be set. But Blackadder represented the creative energy we all had in the ’80s. To try to replicate that 30 years on wouldn’t be easy.’

TV show: Blackadder stars (from left): Tim McInnerny, Rowan Atkinson, Stephen Fry, Tony Robinson and Hugh Laurie

TV show: Blackadder characters (from left) Tim McInnerny, Rowan Atkinson, Stephen Fry, Tony Robinson and Hugh Laurie

An honour: During his Lorraine appearance, Tony also revealed that Prince William is a fan of the show and even suggested joining for an appearance 'if he was asked' while he was honoured in 2013

An honour: During his Lorraine appearance, Tony also revealed that Prince William is a fan of the show and even suggested joining for an appearance ‘if he was asked’ while he was honoured in 2013

Tony later told the publication: ‘Well, what Rowan has always said to me is if there was to be another Blackadder it shouldn’t necessarily be another six-part television series. We should find another guise for it, another way of doing it.’

The news comes after it was reported The BBC has slapped warnings on episodes of Blackadder because of jokes which viewers may find offensive.

Fans watching the comedies on iPlayer will now be greeted with a message at the start of the offending episodes.

Blackadder, first aired in 1983, uses a slur in its second episode which the BBC decided warrants the warning.

In the episode, Rowan’s character clashes with Dougal MacAngus who has just returned from the Crusades and is awarded Blackadder’s land as a result of his good service. 

Out of the picture: Last year, Rowan addressed returning to the show in an interview with Radio Times and said it 'certainly wasn't impossible. That's about a optimistic as I can be'

Out of the picture: Last year, Rowan addressed returning to the show in an interview with Radio Times and said it ‘certainly wasn’t impossible. That’s about a optimistic as I can be’

Blackadder says: ‘You come in here fresh from slaughtering a couple of Chocos when their backs were turned and you think you can upset the harmony of a whole kingdom.’ 

The slur, derived from chocolate to describe a black person’s skin colour, landed football pundit Richard Keys in trouble when he used it to describe a player in 2011.

Another episode of the sitcom also uses a derogatory term for a Spaniard.

The BBC told MailOnline: ‘We want classic shows and series on BBC iPlayer.

‘Attitudes and language change over time and our approach, just like other streaming services, is to tell viewers when a show includes something that may be offensive, inappropriate or outdated and because some people aren’t offended, it doesn’t mean that others aren’t.’

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