Married man, 47, got glass stuck in his bum for three days while drunk

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A Nepalese man who shoved a glass into his anus needed to get it yanked out by surgeons. 

The constipated 47-year-old, who wasn’t named, waited three days before seeking medical attention and initially denied inserting it on purpose. 

He later confessed to medics he had used the 12cm-long glass for ‘self-gratification purposes’ when drunk. 

The married man from Kathmandu only sought help after unsuccessfully trying to remove the glass himself. 

Writing in the Journal of Nepal Medical Association, medics claimed he had been unable to defecate for two days but was still able to pass wind. 

The constipated 47-year-old, who wasn't named, waited three days before seeking medical attention and initially denied inserting it on purpose. The married man from Kathmandu only sought help after unsuccessfully trying to remove the glass himself

The constipated 47-year-old, who wasn’t named, waited three days before seeking medical attention and initially denied inserting it on purpose. The married man from Kathmandu only sought help after unsuccessfully trying to remove the glass himself

The man eventually confessed to medics he had used the 12cm-long glass for 'self-gratification purposes' when drunk. Initial attempts to remove the glass from the man's rectum at hospital proved unsuccessful. Left with no other option, the man's stomach had to be cut into to allow the team to get closer to the object

The man eventually confessed to medics he had used the 12cm-long glass for ‘self-gratification purposes’ when drunk. Initial attempts to remove the glass from the man’s rectum at hospital proved unsuccessful. Left with no other option, the man’s stomach had to be cut into to allow the team to get closer to the object

While the man reported being in pain, his abdomen was not swollen and he also had no anal injury or bleeding.

The date of incident was not revealed in the case report by doctors at Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital.

Upon examination, his mood and behaviour patterns ‘were normal’ and he had no history of psychiatric illnesses. 

X-ray scans showed a water glass in an inverted position in the upper rectum and colon.

Revealed: The risks of putting things in your anus

People most commonly shove objects into their rectum for sexual pleasure.

This is partly to do with the number of nerves in the anus making it highly sensitive, and for men can simulate the prostate, an erogenous part of the male reproductive system.

The insertion of objects into a rectum, also known as anal play, carries a number of risks.

As well as getting stuck objects, they can also potentially perforate the bowel which can be deadly as material from the digestive tract can spill into other parts of the body, causing an infection.

The NHS advises that anyone exploring anal play do so safely, and use an object with a flared base to prevent it from getting lost inside.

Doctors ruled out performing a sigmoidoscopy — a procedure allowing medics to look inside the sigmoid colon by using a flexible tube with a light on it — over fears the cup would break ‘on removal’.  

But initial attempts to remove the glass from the man’s rectum at hospital proved unsuccessful. 

Asked to lay flat on his back with his legs in the air, surgeons tried to pull the cup out manually. 

However they failed because the glass ‘could not be grasped for removal’ and there was ‘significantly high risk of glass breakage which could, in turn, lead to injury to the bowel’, medics said. 

Left with no other option, the man’s stomach had to be cut into to allow the team to get closer to the object.

Doctors felt the glass in the colon but again were unable to extract the glass through the anus ‘as the glass was high up, inverted and tightly wedged’.   

Surgeons then decided to undertake a sigmoid enterotomy — where an incision is made into an intestine — and successfully retrieved the cup that way. 

Following surgery he had a pelvic drain inserted, often used to prevent the accumulation of fluid following operations, as well as to monitor whether there is any leakages.

After five days the man was able to start defecating again, while the drain was then removed on the sixth day. 

He was discharged a week after surgery and a follow-up appointment two months later revealed there were no complications. 

Discussing the issue of rectal insertions generally, the medics noted that most cases where men get objects stuck inside their rectums are men between the ages of 30 and 40.

They added that items such as soda and beer bottles, deodorant containers, wooden or rubber objects, bones and batteries had all been previously reported as being found lodged in patient’s backsides.

A 2021 study by The Royal College of Surgeons of England, found the incidence of objects having to be removed from rectums by the NHS is on the rise. Cases were growing particularly quickly among men

A 2021 study by The Royal College of Surgeons of England, found the incidence of objects having to be removed from rectums by the NHS is on the rise. Cases were growing particularly quickly among men

Most patients are usually drunk when the items are inserted, doctors said.

Retrieving objects stuck in the rectum was first logged in medical literature back in the 16th century. 

NHS doctors are no stranger to dealing with similar incidents, with data analysis last year finding about 400 ‘foreign’ objects are pulled from English anuses each year.

This was estimated to cost the taxpayer roughly £340,000 a year for things like drugs for performing procedures, and the manpower of NHS staff.

People most commonly shove objects into their rectum for sexual pleasure, with medics noting these incidents is ‘rising’. 

This is partly to do with the number of nerves in the anus making it highly sensitive, and for men it can also stimulate the prostate, an erogenous part of the male reproductive system.

For women it can also indirectly stimulate parts of the vagina.

But the insertion of objects into a rectum, also known as anal play, carries a number of risks.

As well as getting stuck objects, they can also potentially perforate the bowel which can be deadly as material from the digestive tract can spill into other parts of the body, causing an infection.



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